Rachel Crandall, the head of Transgender Michigan, created Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV) in 2009 out of frustration that the only well-known day each year focused on transgender communities was Transgender Day of Remembrance

“The day of remembrance is exactly what it is. It remembers the people who died,” Rachel said. “[Transgender Day of Visibility] focuses on the living.”

Now observed across the country each year on March 31, TDOV celebrates the accomplishments and victories of transgender and gender diverse people while raising awareness of the issues that trans people face on a daily basis.

Recently, Laverne Cox shared her thoughts on why visibility is more important now than ever, especially in today’s climate: “I believe the more we claim who we are publicly, show up and allow ourselves to be seen, insist on and fight for our humanity, for justice and equity with love and empathy, we will not, we cannot be erased.”

This is such a profound reminder in this moment—just this year, there are already eight reported murders of transgender women of color across the country.

On Transgender Day of Visibility, we pay tribute to all those who have boldly shared their stories, spoken out against discrimination, and created paths toward full lived and legal equality in the Northwest and across the country. From Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, to modern-day activists such as Janet Mock, Gavin Grimm, the Lady B, Lucas Leek, Oblio Stroyman, and Shawn Reagor, to the transgender members of our staff and board, and proud transgender members of our community—we honor your story, your resilience, your accomplishments.

Here’s what you can do to celebrate Transgender Day of Visibility:

Together, we will work toward the day when we can celebrate Transgender Day of Equality.

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